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PinkMonkey.com-MonkeyNotes-The Taming of the Shrew, by William Shakespeare


PinkMonkey® Quotations on . . .

The Taming of the Shrew

By William Shakespeare QUOTATION: They thought it good you hear a play,
And frame your mind to mirth and merriment,
Which bars a thousand harms and lengthens life.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Messenger, in The Taming of the Shrew, Induction, sc. 2, l. 134-6.

QUOTATION: Now I see our lances are but straws,
Our strength as weak, our weakness past compare,
That seeming to be most which we indeed least are.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Katherina, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 5, sc. 2, l. 173-5.

QUOTATION: Hortensio. Madam, my instrument’s in tune.
Bianca. Let’s hear. O fie, the treble jars.
Lucentio. Spit in the hole, man, and tune again.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Hortensio, Bianca, and Lucentio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 3, sc. 1, l. 38-40.

QUOTATION: My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 4, sc. 1, l. 190-2.

QUOTATION: And where two raging fires meet together;
They do consume the thing that feeds their fury.
Though little fire grows great with little wind,
Yet extreme gusts will blow out fire and all.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British poet. The Taming of the Shrew (II, i).

QUOTATION: What, is the jay more precious than the lark
Because his feathers are more beautiful?
Or is the adder better than the eel
Because his painted skin contents the eye?
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 4, sc. 3, l. 175-8.

QUOTATION: Where two raging fires meet together,
They do consume the thing that feeds their fury.
Though little fire grows great with little wind,
Yet extreme gusts will blow out fire and all.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 2, sc. 1, l. 132-5.

QUOTATION: Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor,
For ‘tis the mind that makes the body rich,
And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds,
So honor peereth in the meanest habit.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 4, sc. 3, l. 171-4.

QUOTATION: Hortensio. What happy gale
Blows you to Padua here from old Verona?
Petruchio. Such wind as scatters young men through the world
To seek their fortunes farther than at home,
Where small experience grows.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Hortensio and Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 1, sc. 2, l. 48-52.

QUOTATION: A woman moved is like a fountain troubled.
Muddy, ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty,
And while it is so, none so dry or thirsty
Will deign to sip or touch one drop of it.
ATTRIBUTION: William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British dramatist, poet. Katherina, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 5, sc. 2, l. 142-5.

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