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PinkMonkey.com-MonkeyNotes-Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen


PinkMonkey® Quotations on . . .

Sense and Sensibility

By Jane Austen QUOTATION: I am afraid that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.
ATTRIBUTION: Jane Austen (1775–1817), British novelist. Elinor, in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 13 (1811).

QUOTATION: On every formal visit a child ought to be of the party, by way of provision for discourse.
ATTRIBUTION: Jane Austen (1775–1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 6 (1811).

QUOTATION: There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.
ATTRIBUTION: Jane Austen (1775–1817), British novelist. Colonel Brandon in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 11 (1811).

QUOTATION: It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;Mit is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.
ATTRIBUTION: Jane Austen (1775–1817), British novelist. Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 12 (1811).

QUOTATION: Fortunately for those who pay their court through such foibles, a fond mother, though, in pursuit of praise for her children, the most rapacious of human beings, is likewise the most credulous; her demands are exorbitant; but she will swallow any thing.
ATTRIBUTION: Jane Austen (1775–1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Sense and Sensibility, ch. 21 (1811).

 


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