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PinkMonkey.com-MonkeyNotes-Return of the Native, by Thomas Hardy


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Return of the Native

By Thomas Hardy QUOTATION: The place became full of a watchful intentness now; for when other things sank brooding to sleep the heath appeared slowly to awake and listen. Every night its Titanic form seemed to await something; but it had waited thus, unmoved, during so many centuries, through the crises of so many things, that it could only be imagined to await one last crisis—the final overthrow.
ATTRIBUTION: Thomas Hardy (1840–1928), British novelist, poet. The Return of the Native, book first, ch. 34 (1878).

QUOTATION: He had been a lad of whom something was expected. Beyond this all had been chaos. That he would be successful in an original way, or that he would go to the dogs in an original way, seemed equally probable. The only absolute certainty about him was that he would not stand still in the circumstances amid which he was born.
ATTRIBUTION: Thomas Hardy (1840–1928), British novelist, poet. The Return of the Native, book third, ch. I (1878).

QUOTATION: The instincts of merry England lingered on here with exceptional vitality, and the symbolic customs which tradition has attached to each season of the year were yet a reality on Egdon. Indeed, the impulses of all such outlandish hamlets are pagan still: in these spots homage to nature, self-adoration, frantic gaieties, fragments of Teutonic rites to divinities whose names are forgotten, seem in some way or other to have survived mediaeval doctrine.
ATTRIBUTION: Thomas Hardy (1840–1928), British novelist, poet. The Return of the Native, book sixth, ch. I (1878).

QUOTATION: A well-proportioned mind is one which shows no particular bias; one of which we may safely say that it will never cause its owner to be confined as a madman, tortured as a heretic, or crucified as a blasphemer. Also, on the other hand, that it will never cause him to be applauded as a prophet, revered as a priest, or exalted as a king. Its usual blessings are happiness and mediocrity.
ATTRIBUTION: Thomas Hardy (1840–1928), British novelist, poet. The Return of the Native, book third, ch. II (1878).

QUOTATION: A whole village-full of sensuous emotion, scattered abroad all the year long, surged here in a focus for an hour. The forty hearts of those waving couples were beating as they had not done since, twelve months before, they had come together in similar jollity. For the time Paganism was revived in their hearts, the pride of life was all in all, and they adored none other than themselves.
ATTRIBUTION: Thomas Hardy (1840–1928), British novelist, poet. The Return of the Native, book fourth, ch. III (1878).

QUOTATION: Twilight combined with the scenery of Egdon Heath to evolve a thing majestic without severity, impressive without showiness, emphatic in its admonitions, grand in its simplicity. The qualifications which frequently invest the facade of a prison with far more dignity than is found in the facade of a palace double its size lent to this health a sublimity in which spots renowned for beauty of the accepted kind are utterly wanting. Fair prospects wed happily with fair times; but alas, if times be not fair!
ATTRIBUTION: Thomas Hardy (1840–1928), British novelist, poet. The Return of the Native, book first, ch. I (1878).

 


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