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PinkMonkey.com-MonkeyNotes-The Picture of Dorian Grey, by Oscar Wilde


PinkMonkey® Quotations on . . .

The Picture of Dorian Grey

By Oscar Wilde QUOTATION: There is something terribly morbid in the modern sympathy with pain. One should sympathise with the colour, the beauty, the joy of life. The less said about life’s sores the better.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).

QUOTATION: The tragedy of old age is not that one is old, but that one is young.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891).

QUOTATION: People who love only once in their lives are ... shallow people. What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or their lack of imagination. Faithfulness is to the emotional life what consistency is to the life of the intellect—simply a confession of failures.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 4 (1891).

QUOTATION: One can always be kind to people about whom one cares nothing.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8.

QUOTATION: She tried to found a salon, and only succeeded in opening a restaurant.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).

QUOTATION: The only difference between a caprice and a life-long passion is that the caprice lasts a little longer.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891).

QUOTATION: Those who are faithful know only the trivial side of love: it is the faithless who know love’s tragedies.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).

QUOTATION: It is a sad truth, but we have lost the faculty of giving lovely names to things. Names are everything. I never quarrel with actions. My one quarrel is with words.... The man who could call a spade a spade should be compelled to use one. It is the only thing he is fit for.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 17 (1891).

QUOTATION: A man can be happy with any woman, as long as he does not love her.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).

QUOTATION: I choose my friends for their good looks, my acquaintances for their good characters, and my enemies for their intellects. A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies.
ATTRIBUTION: Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).

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