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PinkMonkey.com-MonkeyNotes-My Antonia, by Willa Cather


PinkMonkey® Quotations on . . .

My Antonia

By Willa Cather

QUOTATION: I think of you more often than of anyone else in this part of the world. I’d have liked to have you for a sweetheart, or a wife, or my mother or my sister—anything that a woman can be to a man. The idea of you is a part of my mind; you influence my likes and dislikes, all my tastes, hundreds of times when I don’t realize it. You really are a part of me.
ATTRIBUTION: Willa Cather (1873–1947), U.S. novelist. Jim Burden, in My Antonia, book IV, ch. IV (1918; rev. 1926).

QUOTATION: Winter lies too long in country towns; hangs on until it is stale and shabby, old and sullen. On the farm the weather was the great fact, and men’s affairs went on underneath it, as the streams creep under the ice. But in Black Hawk the scene of human life was spread out shrunken and pinched, frozen down to the bare stalk.
ATTRIBUTION: Willa Cather (1873–1947), U.S. novelist. Jim Burden, in My Antonia, book II, ch. VII (1918; rev. 1926).

QUOTATION: The windy springs and the blazing summers, one after another, had enriched and mellowed that flat tableland; all the human effort that had gone into it was coming back in long, sweeping lines of fertility. The changes seemed beautiful and harmonious to me; it was like watching the growth of a great man or of a great idea. I recognized every tree and sandbank and rugged draw. I found that I remembered the conformation of the land as one remembers the modelling of human faces.
ATTRIBUTION: Willa Cather (1873–1947), U.S. novelist. Jim Burden, in My Antonia, book IV, ch. III (1918; rev. 1926).

QUOTATION: I kept as still as I could. Nothing happened. I did not expect anything to happen. I was something that lay under the sun and felt it, like the pumpkins, and I did not want to be anything more. I was entirely happy. Perhaps we feel like that when we die and become a part of something entire, whether it is sun and air, or goodness and knowledge. At any rate, that is happiness; to be dissolved into something complete and great. When it comes to one, it comes as naturally as sleep.
ATTRIBUTION: Willa Cather (1873–1947), U.S. novelist. Jim Burden, in My Antonia, book I, ch. II (1918; rev. 1926).

QUOTATION: There were no clouds, the sun was going down in a limpid, gold-washed sky. Just as the lower edge of the red disk rested on the high fields against the horizon, a great black figure suddenly appeared on the face of the sun. We sprang to our feet, straining our eyes toward it. In a moment we realized what it was. On some upland farm, a plough had been left standing in the field. The sun was sinking just behind it. Magnified across the distance by the horizontal light, it stood out against the sun, was exactly contained within the circle of the disk; the handles, the tongue, the share—black against the molten red. There it was, heroic in size, a picture writing on the sun.
ATTRIBUTION: Willa Cather (1873–1947), U.S. novelist. Jim Burden, in My Antonia, book II, ch. XIV (1918; rev. 1926).

QUOTATION: As we walked homeward across the fields, the sun dropped and lay like a great golden globe in the low west. While it hung there, the moon rose in the east, as big as a cart-wheel, pale silver and streaked with rose colour, thin as a bubble or a ghost-moon. For five, perhaps ten minutes, the two luminaries confronted each other across the level land, resting on opposite edges of the world.
In that singular light every little tree and shock of wheat, every sunflower stalk and clump of snow-on-the-mountain, drew itself up high and pointed; the very clods and furrows in the fields seemed to stand up sharply. I felt the old pull of the earth, the solemn magic that comes out of those fields at nightfall. I wished I could be a little boy again, and that my way could end there.
ATTRIBUTION: Willa Cather (1873–1947), U.S. novelist. Jim Burden, in My Antonia, book IV, ch. IV (1918; rev. 1926).

QUOTATION: On starlight nights I used to pace up and down those long, cold streets, scowling at the little, sleeping houses on either side, with their storm-windows and covered back porches. They were flimsy shelters, most of them poorly built of light wood, with spindle porch-posts horribly mutilated by the turning-lathe. Yet for all their frailness, how much jealousy and envy and unhappiness some of them managed to contain! The life that went on in them seemed to me made up of evasions and negations; shifts to save cooking, to save washing and cleaning, devices to propitiate the tongue of gossip. This guarded mode of existence was like living under a tyranny. People’s speech, their voices, their very glances, became furtive and repressed. Every individual taste, every natural appetite, was bridled by caution. The people asleep in those houses, I thought, tried to live like the mice in their own kitchens; to make no noise, to leave no trace, to slip over the surface of things in the dark.
ATTRIBUTION: Willa Cather (1873–1947), U.S. novelist. Jim Burden, in My Antonia, book II, ch. XII (1918; rev. 1926).

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