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PinkMonkey.com-MonkeyNotes-A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, by Mark Twain


PinkMonkey® Quotations on . . .

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

By Mark Twain QUOTATION: How empty is theory in the presence of fact!
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 43 (1889).

QUOTATION: A jackass has that kind of strength, and puts it to a useful purpose, and is valuable to the world because he is a jackass; but a nobleman is not valuable because he is a jackass. It is a mixture that is always ineffectual, and should never have been attempted in the first place. And yet, once you start a mistake, the trouble is done and you never know what is going to come of it.
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 15 (1889).

QUOTATION: Knighterrantry is a most chuckleheaded trade, and it is tedious hard work, too, but I begin to see that there is money in it, after all, if you have luck. Not that I would ever engage in it, as a business, for I wouldn’t. No sound and legitimate business can be established on a basis of speculation. A successful whirl in the knighterrantry line—now what is it when you blow away the nonsense and come down to the cold facts? It’s just a corner in pork, that’s all.
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 19 (1889).

QUOTATION: Their very imagination was dead. When you can say that of a man, he has struck bottom, I reckon; there is no lower deep for him.
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 20 (1889).

QUOTATION: All gentle cant and philosophizing to the contrary notwithstanding, no people in this world ever did achieve their freedom by goody-goody talk and moral suasion: it being immutable law that all revolutions that will succeed, must begin in blood.
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 20 (1889).

QUOTATION: Well, I had gone and spoiled it again, made another mistake. A double one in fact. There were plenty of ways to get rid of that officer by some simple and plausible device, but no, I must pick out a picturesque one; it is the crying defect of my character.
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 37 (1889).

QUOTATION: There are wise people who talk ever so knowingly and complacently about “the working classes,” and satisfy themselves that a day’s hard intellectual work is very much harder than a day’s hard manual toil, and is righteously entitled to much bigger pay.... As far as I’m concerned, there isn’t money enough in the universe to hire me to swing a pickaxe thirty days, but I will do the hardest kind of intellectual work for just as near nothing as you can cipher it down—and I will be satisfied, too.... The law of work does seem utterly unfair—but there it is, and nothing can change it: the higher the pay in enjoyment the worker gets out of it, the higher shall be his pay in cash, too.
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 28 (1889).

QUOTATION: My heart got to thumping. You can’t reason with your heart; it has its own laws, and thumps about things which the intellect scorns.
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 20 (1889).

QUOTATION: We have no thoughts of our own: they are transmitted to us, trained into us. All that is original in us, and therefore fairly creditable or discreditable to us, can be covered up and hidden by the point of a cambric needle, all the rest being atoms contributed by, and inherited from, a procession of ancestors that stretches back a billion years to the Adam-clam or grasshopper or monkey from whom our race has been so tediously and ostentatiously and unprofitably developed. And as for me, all that I think about in this plodding sad pilgrimage, this pathetic drift between the eternities, is to look out and humbly live a pure and high and blameless life, and save that one microscopic atom in me that is truly me: the rest may land in Sheol and welcome, for all I care.
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 18 (1889).

QUOTATION: It was only just words, words,—they meant nothing in the world to him, I might just as well have whistled. Words realize nothing, vivify nothing to you, unless you have suffered in your own person the thing which the words try to describe.
ATTRIBUTION: Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. Hank Morgan, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, ch. 28 (1889).

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