free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

THE TITLE OF THE PLAY

The reference to the streetcar or tram called Desire is highly ironic. Blanche has to travel on it to reach Elysian Fields, her sister's home. It also means that she has already indulged in Desire before reaching here. But this place will not bring her the rest and security which the name 'Elysian Fields' indicates; instead, Blanche will experience violence and brutality. In fact, she calls her sister's love for Stanley "brutal desire" and likens it to the streetcar that she snobbishly dubs as a "rattle-trap". Ironically, desire does become her trap. To escape her horrifying near-encounters with death through family members, she sought Desire. Her sorrow is that the pleasure brought from Desire was fleeting, just like the tram journey was short-lived. It could not give her security and stability, the things she wants from life. Yet, she cannot return on the Streetcar named Desire, because it is only a one way ticket; she has already ridden on Desire, and it has brought her nothing but sorrow and loneliness. Ironically, the Streetcar named Desire leads to the Streetcar named Cemetery. Blanche appropriately rides them both.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:53:32 AM