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Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte - Barron's Booknotes
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STYLE

Emily Bronte's language is both spare and dense, which is why
it's often compared to poetry. When you finish the novel, you
have a firm sense of the bleak beauty of the moors, for
instance, yet there are remarkably few descriptions of the
landscape. What is there is immediately evocative.

Her prose is also unusually rhythmic, often violent and abrupt.
The verbs themselves are almost hysterical, until the final
paragraph, in which the moths "flutter" and the soft winds
"breathe."



Her two sources of imagery are nature (animals, plants, fire,
the land, the weather) and the supernatural (angel/devil,
heaven/hell). These are evident in the words she uses and the
mental pictures she evokes.

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Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte - Barron's Booknotes
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