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ACT II, SCENE VI

A little while later, Friar Lawrence and Romeo are waiting in the Friar's cell. Romeo says something that sounds odd, coming from a bridegroom:

Do thou but close our hands with holy words, Then love-devouring death do what he dare It is enough I may but call her mine. (II, vi, 6-8) He's still responding, perhaps subconsciously, to his earlier fear that he's about to die. Does he really mean that if they're married, he's won, even over death? If those are his terms for victory, have the lovers "won" at the end of the play?

The Friar, doing his religious duty, restates the church's warning about their passion:

These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which, as they kiss, consume. (II, vi, 9-11)



Again, the lovers' passion is compared to a brilliant light that goes out as soon as it's lit. But when Juliet enters, the Friar can't help but admire her, almost as much as Romeo does. Romeo and Juliet are so thrilled just to be together that getting married almost seems an added attraction. But the Friar nonetheless recognizes the depth of their passion. He decides he'd better get them married before he leaves them alone, so that their physical relationship will be holy.

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