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Free Study Guide-Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte-Free BookNotes
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Chapter 24

Summary

When Nelly recovers from her illness, Cathy admits that she has been visiting Linton almost every day and gives her details of her visits to the Heights. She explains that on her second visit she debated with Linton about the most pleasant manner of spending a hot July day. Both had different ideas and found the other's intolerable. Cathy also tells about Hareton Earnshaw trying to speak to her; she admits that she ridiculed the boy for his inability to read and sent him away, feeling sullen and ashamed. When Cathy was about to read to Linton, Hareton burst into the room. A violent scene followed between the three of them, and Linton was choked by a dreadful fit of coughing, which made him fall to the ground. Although Hareton later apologized to Cathy, she punished him with a whip.

On her next visit to the Heights, Linton blamed Cathy for the earlier scene that had taken place. Angered by his accusations, she quickly left. Two days later, she returned and informed Linton that she would not come back again. She explained, "As you don't like me, Linton, and as you think I come on purpose to hurt you . . . this is our last meeting--let us say good-bye." Linton begged her to stay; therefore, they were reconciled once again. Cathy pleads with Nelly not to tell her father about her visits to the Heights. However, Nelly duly reports the entire story to her master.


Notes

Cathy admits to Nelly that she has been visiting Linton at the Heights on a regular basis, encouraged by Heathcliff's absence and Zillah's encouragement. She has grown fond of the ailing, demanding, and complaining young man, who seems to genuinely care for Cathy. The basic difference between Cathy and Linton is indicated by their quarrel concerning the ideal way to spend a hot July day. Since they are essentially polar opposites, they normally disagree.

Another side of Cathy is revealed in her relationship to her cousin Hareton. She laughs at the boy for his awkward ways and inability to read. In spite of this treatment, Hareton develops an interest in Cathy and shows his jealousy towards her devotion to Linton. When he bursts in open Cathy and Linton together, a quarrel ensues, in which Cathy is cruel. Hareton reacts in a very sensitive manner. It is obvious that the cruelty of others easily hurts him.

When Nelly tells Edgar of Cathy's visits to the Heights, he puts an end to Cathy's ventures into that dangerous territory. Edgar does say, however, that Linton can pay visits to Cathy at the Grange.

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