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MonkeyNotes-Walden by Henry David Thoreau
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Notes

The second chapter commences in much the same voice as the first, with the author continuing to reflect on the peace and fullness he has experienced as a result of his time at Walden Pond. Two aspects of Walden are particularly important in this chapter. First, Thoreau's character is further developed. In this chapter, he describes the process by which he arrived at Walden Pond, and as a result reveals his already remarkable inner life. Even before arriving at Walden Pond, Thoreau was deeply involved with his self, to the point that he even pretended to buy and own parcels of land. His imagination led him to even be refused certain parcels of land he wanted. This vivid inner self is an important part of understanding the character of the man so driven to live in solitude.


The second thing brought out in this chapter is a continuation of Thoreau's theme that a simple life is more liberating and rewarding than any other. Thoreau's earnest desire to live apart from the objects of social binding is reiterated here to the point that he even discourages too many social relationships and, thus, responsibilities. Thoreau advises that the best way to escape the vicious circle of mundane society is to have total independence. This includes the ability to manage well all one's affairs. His relocation to Walden Pond was simply a way of simplifying his social circle and, therefore, his self-management.

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