free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Walden by Henry David Thoreau
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Thoreau believed in simplicity and living a non-cluttered existence. As early as 1840, before his two-year stay with Emerson, Thoreau entertained the idea of living alone in a serene setting in Nature. In 1845, he borrowed an axe and set out for Walden Pond to live on a piece of land owned by Emerson. He built himself a small cabin in which to live and cultivated land to grow vegetables for his meals. During his stay at Walden Pond, he closely observed Nature and her many creatures and plants. He would also walk into Concord in order to make comparisons to his life in the wild to the more civilized existence of town living. In his journal, he kept a daily record of all of his observations and musings. He used this journal as the basis of his book, Walden.

Walden, although published during Thoreau's lifetime, gave him neither financial nor literary success. Even after the book's publication and lack of success, Thoreau did not grow discouraged. He continued to keep his journal, trying to make daily entries. He also continued with other literary efforts and traveled to several parts of America in an attempt to see more of his country and learn more about himself.


Thoreau strongly believed in the individual. As a result, he became actively involved with the anti-slavery movement. His stance as an active Abolitionist brought him some limelight in the political sphere. He also became known for his opposition to any form of institutionalization and his belief that no individual, no matter his color or his status in life, should be sacrificed for the sake of society. Thoreau published a pamphlet on "Civil Disobedience," voicing his opposition to the government's oppression over individuals. In 1859, Thoreau published A Plea for Captain John Brown, followed by Life without Principle, published after his death, in 1864.

Consumed with tuberculosis, Thoreau died on May 6, 1862, at Concord. His death, at the age of forty-five, went largely unnoticed, with merely a handful of literary personalities paying tribute to him. Even Emerson did not do Thoreau justice, for he took much undue credit for Thoreau's work. In actuality, Thoreau remained virtually an unknown writer for at least half a century after his death. In the early twentieth century, however, he became recognized as an author, and Walden became a popular book, especially in the classroom. Today this masterpiece of non-fiction is acknowledged as a classic piece of American literature.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Walden by Henry David Thoreau
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:53:44 AM