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MonkeyNotes-Ulysses by James Joyce
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Molly thinks about the pork chop she had had with her cup of tea. Perhaps it was not fresh. The pork butcher is unreliable and her stomach is upset. She thinks of the morning’s breakfast, and the food she has planned for the coming day, "I’ll get a nice piece of God." Memories of boating and Mediterranean fishermen follow. Bloom has had all sorts of dreams about making money and having luxurious holidays in the Mediterranean. But they have never amounted to anything. Molly has to spend all her time lonely in this big, barracks-like house. It was more cheerful when Milly lived there. On the other hand, she feels some relief that Milly is away. She was beginning to be jealous of her daughter’s maturity and sophistication. Her train of thoughts is interrupted by the sudden appearance of her menstrual period.


Molly wonders if she should go and see her doctor. Generally she is cynical about his behavior. She remembers visiting him before she got married and the jaw-breaking technical terms he had used then. Again she recalls Bloom’s courtship, the beautiful letters he used to write and his curious behavior nowadays. She doubts again Bloom’s account of his day’s adventures. She thinks fondly of Stephen who seems likely to be a sensitive lover, not like the boisterous Boylan or her odd husband. Thoughts of Stephen trigger recollections of Rudy. Her thoughts turn to Bloom. She thinks of recapturing their long-lost full marital relationship, by going out of her way to attract and satisfy him. If she fails, she will make him suffer the story of her adulteries. She will make him pay her handsomely for any privileges. The clock strikes. Her thoughts range widely over the whole sleeping world. She thinks of flowers. She enjoys a recollection of her first love-making with Bloom. She admits that Bloom’s "heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will yes."

Molly’s affirmation of life is one facet of a great complex whole wherein the forces of evil operate strongly too. The evil in Molly, as well as the evil in her environment, has already struck the reader, as dominant. Right now the good in Molly, and the real possible good in her environment seem to be dominant. Molly is as much a mystery as is reality. She has been fascinating, and she still is, and will always be a woman of infinite variety.

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