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MonkeyNotes-The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare
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Act V, Scene 4

As the solitary Valentine contemplates his personal misery, he is startled to see his beloved Silvia enter the scene;she is followed by an eager Proteus forcibly wooing her. The innocent Valentine cannot believe his eyes or ears, but refrains himself from immediate intervention so that he can learn more about the situation. Silvia soon reveals her misery at having been rescued by the vile Proteus and declares her love for Valentine:

Had I been seized by a hungry lion, I would have been a breakfast to the beast, Rather than have false Proteus rescue me. O, heaven be judge how I love Valentine, Whose life's as tender to me as my soul. . . I do detest false, perjured Proteus: Therefore, be gone, solicit me no more.


She then berates Proteus for deserting Julia and betraying Valentine. The despicable Proteus asks, "In love, who respects friend?" He then promises to "force thee to yield to my desire."

Valentine needs to hear no more. He confronts Proteus, calls him a "common friend. . .without faith or love," and demands that he release Silvia. Proteus begs for forgiveness and Valentine, seeing his remorse, offers to yield Silvia to him. Julia, still disguised as Sebastian, faints at this proposition. When she recovers, she produces two rings, one the present to her from Proteus and the other her present to him. Proteus stands aghast and quickly realizes that his page, Sebastian, is no other than his Julia. He begs forgiveness from her as well.

The two gentlemen from Verona are reconciled with their ladies. When Thurio enters the scene to claim Silvia, he backs out quickly when threatened by Valentine. The Duke feels admiration for Valentine's spirit and grants him Silvia's hand in marriage. Valentine asks the Duke to pardon his bandit friends. The Duke grants amnesty to the outlaws. In a buoyant spirit, the Duke exclaims that he wishes to conclude all quarreling. To celebrate the special occasion, he decides to host a public festival.

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