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MonkeyNotes-Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare
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Act I, Scene 5

Feste, the jester or Fool is introduced in this scene. He is Olivia's servant although he has been away from the house for long periods of time. On his return after one such absence, he refuses to tell Maria where he has been and also makes Olivia aware of the futility of mourning her brother. Malvolio, Olivia's steward, is also introduced in this scene and is revealed as a highminded, overly serious man who expresses an extreme dislike of Feste and "these set kind of fools." Olivia rebukes him, commenting that he is too full of 'self-love.' Maria then informs Olivia about a young gentleman who has been stopped at the gate by Sir Toby. Malvolio is sent to find out the identity of the gentleman. He is also instructed to send away any messenger who comes on behalf of the Duke. Malvolio returns to inform Olivia that the young gentleman (Viola) refuses to go away. After he describes him to Olivia, she becomes curious and agrees to meet the messenger. Viola is admitted into the house where she converses with both Olivia and Maria until she asserts that she want to speak to Olivia privately. She presents her message but is stopped midway by Olivia who is unimpressed and says that the Duke doesn’t have a chance. Viola requests Olivia to show her face and when she does so, Viola is praises her beauty, and expresses the Duke's love to her.


Olivia, however, is more interested in Viola, and wishes to know more about her. Viola merely mentions that she is of noble birth. "I am a gentleman," she states. They then continue to converse with Viola attempting once again to express the Duke’s love yet Olivia replies that if Viola wants to come back to visit, she is more than welcome. After Viola leaves, Olivia realizes that she has fallen love with Viola/Cesario and sends Malvolio with a ring for Viola on the pretext that Viola/Cesario had left it as a token of the Duke's love which Olivia refuses to accept. Olivia leaves everything in the hands of fate.

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MonkeyNotes-Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare
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