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MonkeyNotes-Troilus and Cressida by William Shakespeare
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The news of Hector’s death spreads around the Greek camp in Scene 9. Agamemnon asks the others to march along quietly, and asks that someone be sent to call Achilles to his tent. He says that if Hector has indeed died and if the gods are with the Greeks in his death, then Troy is theirs and ‘our sharp wars are ended.’

Troilus announces the news of Hector’s death to Aeneas, Paris, Antenor and Deiphobus at the beginning of Scene X and everybody is aghast. Troilus who labels Achilles a ‘great-siz’d coward’ vows vengeance. He then calls for a brisk march back to the city and says that ‘Hope of revenge shall hide our inward woe’, as the Trojan party exits leaving him behind. Pandarus enters and attempts to catch his attention. Troilus tells him to get away, contemptuously calls him ‘broker-lackey’ and hopes ignominy and shame becomes synonymous with his name.


Left alone, Pandarus argues that the employer of panders comes to detest the agent who procured for him, and that the rejected pander once so desirable, soon becomes impotent. He then breaks into a proverbial rhyme that says that the happiness of the pander is lost when he is no longer effective, to support his argument. His epilogue then makes it quite clear that the play was all theatrical entertainment and tries to establish some complicity between himself, the traditional pander, and the men in the audience.

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