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MonkeyNotes-The Trial by Franz Kafka
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Windows also suggest a frame up of the character. "Someone must have traduced Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning." Is that someone the novelist who has framed the standard "K." by writing about his arrest and trial and framed his fiction?

As readers, we continuously respond to this frame up. Windows in "The Trial" are associated with shifting perspective and point of view. Both K. and the reader lose their sense of perspective. The act of framing lends us closer to the perspective. Kafka's ‘The Trial’, is defended by interpretation and slander and prejudgment without which "The Trial" loses its perspective.

'Windows' in "The Trial" are also associated with reading and story telling. They erase the margins between the two. K. gazes out of the windows at his uncle's car, while telling his story. He enters Frau Grubach's living room on the morning of his arrest. He sees "a man who was sitting at the open window reading a book, from which he now glanced up". The inspector snaps at K., "You should have stayed in your room! Didn't Franz tell you that?" The reader's mind could likewise be wandering around every where, unless one is alerted to the gravity of the situation. K. is charged more than once for this offence. The Inspector tells him "Think less about us and of what is going to happen to you, think more about yourself instead". We are as guilty as the abused.


As Joseph K. peers out of the window on the novels' first page through the ancient figure, framing art, which creates maning, K. is matched by the voyeuristic reader. That is "the old lady opposite, who seemed to be peering at him with a curiosity unusual even for her". She is the first of many figures of the reader in Kafka, word, later the old woman shifts rooms and perspective. K. now sees her from the living room window while she, "with truly simile inquisitiveness had moved along to the window exactly opposite, in order to go on seeing all that could be seen. In the chapter, she is joined first by "an even older man," then by a tall "man with the shirt open at the neck and a reddish, pointed beard which he kept pinching and twisting with his fingers." They do not go but seem to return unobserved. They reflect the Voyeuristic reader who becomes troubled when challenged by the gaze of another. While K. seeks Frau Grubach's company for comfort, she is moved to tears, but does not shake his hand, K. cannot remember how Fraulein Bürstner look life.

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