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MonkeyNotes-Tom Jones by Henry Fielding
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Jones plays the gallant once again. When he sees the puppet master beating up the Merry Andrew, he comes to the latter's rescue. He manages to separate Merry Andrews and the violent puppet Master. We notice that throughout the novel, Jones wins many friends by his generosity. Merry Andrews now agrees to take Tom to the place where he had seen Sophia. Jones is very happy to hear about Sophia. He behaves like a mad lover who rejoices on hearing news of his beloved. He is further enthused to follow Sophia's trial. He does not care about the storm that is developing outside.

The author often follows the habit of commenting on previous developments, later in the narrative for instance, he tells us that Tom is not at fault for defaming Sophia. It had been Partridge all this while, who had been talking about Sophia openly, though initially Fielding had let us believe that it was Tom who had been defaming Sophia. She had become the source of gossip in all the Inns that Tom and Partridge stayed in. We can see that the author is quite fond of his hero and defends him on more than one occasion. Tom might be careless and might even get carried way with women but he is essentially a man of honor, who would never defame his beloved.


Dowling, the lawyer makes an appearance once again. Dowling is famous for his busy schedule. He travels much and thus meets Tom often at various Inns. Dowling tells Tom that Blifil is now the heir of Squire Allworthy’s estate. By now Tom does not have a good opinion of Blifil. He knows him to be devious and openly says so. Tom is an emotional man. He does not take long to open up his heart to strangers. He tells Dowling about his birth. Tom is the kind of man who impresses others with his large heartedness. Good people always stick to him. This is the kind of personality that impresses people who love benevolence. Dowling is completely on Jones' side by the end of their conversation.

The author often comments on the different professions and the variety of women. He makes reference to the profession of law and goes on to say that not all lawyers are unscrupulous.

Tom seems determined for a change. Even though he is requested to stop at many inns, he does not. He persists in his pursuit of Sophia. The problem with Tom is that he is sometimes too careless about the sensitivity of the sensible Sophia.

Partridge is portrayed as a superstitious old monk, he had been frightened of an old man of the hill in a previous book. In this book, he is terrified of strong lights and loud noises that he perceives at a distance. Tom laughs at Partridge’s fears.

Fielding inserts an interesting bit about the gypsy way of life. Fielding must have had an excellent knowledge of different kinds of people. The amazing thing about this is that he can write about society aristocrats, lowly maids and even gypsies in the same breath.

Fielding is supportive of the gypsies' sense of justice. Partridge gets away with his little fling with a female gypsy. The fact that Tom sympathizes with the King's sense of justice shows that he himself is a fair-minded person. Tom’s nobility is made to shine through at all times. At St. Alban's, Partridge and Tom stop to get some food and rest. Tom is more or less peaceful, but Partridge has a way of infuriating him, Partridge nags Tom often. Thus Toms looses his temper with the old man. These little starts serve to make the Tom-Partridge relationship interesting. The two can be compared with Don Quixote and his squire. Fielding himself makes a reference to Cervantes' famous pair.

In the last chapter of this Book we get a glimpse of Tom’s large heartedness once again. A highwayman threatens Tom and Partridge. Tom is quick enough to overpower the robber. He does this while Partridge behaves in an extremely cowardly manner. Partridge tries to run away, whereas Tom defends himself; the robber pleads for mercy, saying that his pistol had been empty. Tom finds that this is true and he believes the highway man, when he says he was desperate enough to commit a robbery. Not only does Tom let the man go he also gives him some money. Later in the novel, Tom meets this very same man in London and finds out the he had indeed told the truth. Tom succeeds in creating a well wisher yet again. It is the charm and his large heart that finally enables him to win Sophia.

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