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Free Study Guide-Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens-Online Book Notes
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CHAPTER SUMMARY AND NOTES

CHAPTER 29

Summary

This chapter has an introductory account of the members of the Maylie house.

The chapter unfurls with a description of the dining room of the house where Mr. Giles is serving breakfast to the women of the house, one elderly and the other in her teens. The women look anxious about the doctor's arrival. Soon Mr. Losborne arrives and goes over to examine the boy. After attending to Oliver he pronounces his condition as out of danger. The women look relieved and go up to meet the patient.

Notes

This chapter suggests that although Oliver is surrounded by evil most of the time, he is able to escape its clutches because of his innate goodness. His frail body encompasses a stout heart which induces him to live. This chapter bears resemblance to the opening chapter of the novel where we see the infant Oliver struggling for his life. Finally, he lets out a cry to establish his presence on this earth. Oliver is able to fight against all odds to emerge the winner. In this chapter also we see Oliver wounded and ill but holding on to his life. Even Dr. Losborne pronounces his condition to be serious but assures the women that the boy was out of danger.


CHAPTER 30

Summary

Under the supervision of the doctor, Mrs. Maylie and Rose go over to Oliver's room to have a look at him. They feel quite apprehensive to look at the face of a criminal. However, when they reach his bedside they are surprised to see an innocent boy sleeping on the bed. Both the women find it difficult to believe that Oliver had been involved in the robbery. Rose feels certain that he is an innocent, homeless boy beguiled by bad men. She and her aunt request that doctor have mercy upon the boy and keep him away from the police. The doctor looks doubtful as the servants had identified the boy as an accomplice in the robbery. However, he decides to have a talk with the servants and also with Oliver to ascertain his innocence. When Oliver wakes up he relates to them his sorrowful history. He tells them how he was placed forcibly in the midst of evil men who tried to bring out the worst in him. His words sound true and the doctor looks convinced. Later Dr. Losborne meets Giles and Brittles. He asks Giles whether he was sure of the identity of Oliver as one of the robbers. The servant is not very sure and evades giving a positive reply.

Notes

Thus, Oliver is once again in the company of good people who show sympathy and wish for his speedy recovery. Rose and Mrs. Maylie are the counterparts of Mr. Brownlow and Mrs. Bedwin. In an earlier chapter Mr. Brownlow brings home a sick Oliver to take care of him. Even though he had found Oliver in the place of crime, he believes the boy to be innocent. Rose and Mrs. Maylie also refuse to believe the words of Giles who dubs Oliver as an accomplice in the attempted robbery.

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