free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Middlemarch by George Eliot
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Chapter 55

Summary

The loss of Will troubles Dorothea and she broods alone at Lowick. On a visit to Celia, Dorothea’s heavy mourning dress troubles her sister. She insists on removing her widow’s cap and freeing her hair, to Sir James’ great satisfaction. Mrs. Cadwallader, who is also visiting them, takes off from a discussion on mourning to one on second marriages. This is intended to test Dorothea’s reactions and to shock old Lady Chettam. Dorothea firmly snubs Mrs. Cadwallader’s suggestions. Later she tells Celia she will never re-marry, but devote herself to a sort of commune where people work together in the land. Celia is not very pleased, but Sir James feels her sentiments are proper.


Notes

Dorothea is still not aware that what she feels for Will is love. In any case, she would consider it indecent to consider a second marriage. Hence, the interference of neighbors in her life is annoying to her. Given her substantial property and independent status, she feels she would like to fulfil at least some of her ambition to be socially useful.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Middlemarch by George Eliot
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright © PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:53:12 AM