free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Main Street by Sinclair Lewis
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Notes

This chapter describes the argument that leads to Carol leaving Gopher Prairie. Carol is accused of not showing any interest in the growth of Gopher Prairie. Even Kennicott finds it difficult to understand her disapproval of the campaign to make Gopher Prairie an industrial town. He does not understand what she means when she says that Gopher Prairie has become egomaniac. Kennicott and the others believe in all the lies of Blausser and the pamphlet writer. It is not surprising because they always believe that Gopher Prairie is the best place under the sun. Kennicott cannot understand why Carol cannot admire the white way or why she objects to the factory.

Matters come to a head when Carol fails to applaud the rough handling of the National Nonpartisan League organizer. Kennicott considers it to be most unpatriotic on Carol's part. She points out that when the organizer did not even make a speech he did not break any law and the sheriff leading the merchants to deport him was very illegal. Kennicott declares that when it is the question of defending Americanism one could set aside procedure. Carol points out that the organizer was opposed not because he was seditious but because he might influence the farmers so that Kennicott and his tribe would lose their business. She adds that pro German is a convenient term to describe anything that went against their business interests. If America had been at war with England they would use the term pro English in the place of pro German and after the war they would use the term 'red-anarchists'. She says that the idea was to prevent the dollars from going away from them. Kennicott does not understand the logic of Carol's statements. Since the idea of equality and freedom are not very acceptable, she is persistently misunderstood.


It is after this argument that Carol's longing to go away takes a clear shape. She knows that she cannot go on towing the town's line and accept its diktat. She says that she would find her work. She cleverly argues, 'we are hopeless, we dissatisfied women! Then why do you want to have us about the place, to fret you? So it's for your sake that I'm going!' she promises that she will come back when she has something more than what she has now. Kennicott sees her point and magnanimously allows her to go.

But Carol is unable to see the loneliness on Kennicott's face and wishes to run back to comfort him. She remembers a 'hundred tendernesses of Kennicott. She feels grateful that he had allowed her to go and had given her the money as well. The biggest shock for Carol is perhaps Hugh's attitude. He does not care for her talk about elephants and maharanis but very practically demands to know if he will get cookies. He rebukes her with his question 'why don't you tell me about the Dear Lord?' when she explains generation as, 'a ray in the illumination of the sprit' he simply comments, 'that's foolish'.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Main Street by Sinclair Lewis
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:53:09 AM