free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Main Street by Sinclair Lewis
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Notes

This chapter begins with caricatures of the people of the American Middle West in 1920. The people lack imagination. They do not complain about their dismal surroundings. Descriptions of passengers-for example the old woman 'whose mouth shuts like a mud-turtle's' and her 'extremely indignant parakeet in a cage' and the boy "who plays 'marching to Georgia' till every head in the compartment begins to ache"- indicate the writer's keen observation and wry sense of humor.

The chapter also throws light on the difference in the perception of Carol and Kennicott. According to Carol the people are stolid, provincial and poverty stricken. To Kennicott they are up coming farmers who are quite better off. If Kennicott appreciates Rauskukle's ability to gamble in farmlands Carol asserts that he should pay for beautifying the city, out of which he earned all his wealth. Kennicott who believes in the survival of the fittest can not understand Carol's radical ideas. Nor does he understand her hankering after beauty. When Kennicott rests assured about the not far away prosperity of the American Middle West, Carol worries about the culture that would evolve in that land.


Carol is presented not as a shy bride dreaming about her new home, but as one full of misgivings. She has to remind herself again and again how good and dependable her husband is to stop herself from whining about the place and its people. Her enthusiasm to be a part of the prairie town ebbs and flows. The vastness of the land expands her spirit one moment and frightens her the next. She feels "it is a glorious country; a land to be big in" for one minute and the next minute she is certain "it was not a place to live in, not possibly, not conceivably. "Kenicott on the contrary is sure of the future of his town, his friends and his own life. The poverty around him does not trouble him probably because he perceives it as a necessary stepping stone for prosperity. He never feels the need to change anything. In this sense he is insular.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Main Street by Sinclair Lewis
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:53:08 AM