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MonkeyNotes-The Kitchen God's Wife by Amy Tan
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The gravity of the situation is that, Weili has no one to support her. Hulan cannot help her out with her personal problems. In fact, Hulan feels that she should prove herself to be a better wife by giving her consent to his overtures. If Wen Fu would have been prosecuted after the accident, Weili could have got some peace of mind at least for some days. However, Hulan intervenes and compels Jiaguo, to not lodge a case against Wen Fu. By doing so, Hulan feels that she has proven herself to be a loyal friend. Weili is very disappointed but has to pretend that she is grateful to her friend for having saved her husband from being jailed.


Weili rationalizes her trauma by comparing herself with Jesus. Jesus Christ had to suffer a lot in his life; his crucifixion symbolizes a sacrifice for humanity. But Weili cannot justify in the same way with her case. The tortures, which Christ had to face in his life, had a purpose and a moral lesson. His life is a message for the world. But why should she suffer? The agony, which she faces at Wen Fuís hands, has no meaning or purpose. Nobody is going to worship her as the person who suffers the most. Maybe it would be better if she compares herself with the Kitchen Godís Wife. Weili feels her life somewhat coincides with that of the Kitchen Godís Wife. During the Chinese New Year, people worship and appease the Kitchen God for their gains. But his virtuous and hardworking wife is forgotten. In fact it was only because of her that, he could gain the status of a "God," but all this does not count. Similarly, Weiliís hardships go un-rewarded, in fact unnoticed. She finds it very difficult to bear this neglect but at the same time she is helpless.

When Yiku dies in the hospital Weili is emotionally shattered, but at the same time she also experiences some sort of relief. This is because she feels that, in the long run, it is better to die a quick death rather than face a bitter, harsh life as the one that she has to live. "Good for you, little one," Weili says, "youíve escaped. Good for you." By saying this, Weili tries to console herself at the loss of her dear baby. But she can forgive Wen Fu who is, in a way, responsible for Yikuís death.

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MonkeyNotes-The Kitchen God's Wife by Amy Tan
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