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MonkeyNotes-The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald-Free Booknotes Summary
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SHORT PLOT SUMMARY (Synopsis) (continued)

Nick interrupts the normal narrative of the story to give some Background Information on Gatsby. He was born as James Gatz to poor farmers in North Dakota. At the early age of sixteen, he decides he wants more out of life and leaves home. When he sees a yacht docked out from the beach, it is a symbol to him of the wealthy existence he desires. He rows a borrowed boat out to the yacht and introduces himself to Dan Cody, a fabulously wealthy man given to wild parties and excessive drink. Cody is impressed with the intelligence and determination of the young lad and takes him on as his assistant and protector. From that point forward, James Gatz leaves his real world behind and fabricates his dream world in which he is Jay Gatsby. When he winds up as a soldier, stationed in Louisville, Daisy becomes part of that dream existence.

In reality, the dream is beginning to break up for Gatsby even though he is not aware of it. When Tom brings Daisy to Gatsby's next party, she finds the whole affair to be gaudy and ugly, with women who drink too much and men who are too familiar. Her only pleasures at the party are spending a little time with Gatsby and watching a lovely movie star. She immediately judges this West Egg crowd to be crass; however, when Tom criticizes the party and the guests, Daisy finds herself defending the host, even claiming the people at the party are more interesting than their own friends. She also defends Gatsby, telling Tom that he has made his money from owning a chain of drug stores. When all the guests, including Daisy, have gone home, Gatsby asks Nick to stay for awhile and talk. He is miserable because he feels Daisy has not had a good time. Gatsby's long-held dream is being challenged by reality.


Since Daisy is now a part of his life, Gatsby no longer has to throw his extravagant parties in hopes of attracting her attention. It is never clear to what degree the two of them are involved, but Gatsby dismisses his entire staff of servants to prevent gossip, for Daisy often comes to his house. When Daisy invites Nick and Gatsby over for lunch, Daisy gives Gatsby a kiss on the mouth the minute that Tom walks out of the room. Before long, Tom realizes that there is something going on between Gatsby and his wife and is totally outraged. As a result, he agrees to go into the city, as Daisy has suggested; he is ready for a confrontation with Gatsby.

On the way into town, Tom insists upon driving Gatsby's yellow car, which he calls a circus wagon. Since the car is low on fuel, he stops at Wilson's garage and learns that Wilson has found out that Myrtle is having an affair and is planning to move his wife and him out of town. The news is almost more than Tom can bear; within the last couple of hours, he has learned that his wife is having an affair with a "clown" and that his mistress is moving away. Myrtle, who has been locked away upstairs, is equally panicked. When she looks out and sees Tom, she thinks it may be for the last time. When she spies Jordan Baker, who is riding with Tom, Myrtle thinks it is Tom's wife and is insanely jealous. The mood of the story is definitely intensifying towards the climax of the plot.

Daisy, Tom, Nick, Jordan, and Gatsby rent a suite at the Plaza Hotel. It is like a small party, reminiscent of the one held in Myrtle's apartment and almost as violent. Tom immediately begins to verbally attack Gatsby, questioning his past and his involvement with Daisy. Gatsby stands up to Tom, saying that Daisy does not love him and has never loved him. Gatsby even makes Daisy say the same words to Tom, but she says them without sincerity. In the end, she confesses that she has loved Tom in the past and asks Gatsby why it is not good enough that she loves him in the present. Gatsby's dream, however, does not allow for Tom to be in the picture; he wants to blot out the last five years and recreate them in his own image. Daisy is unwilling to do this; as a result, Tom is the victor. It is obvious that Daisy will not leave Tom and the security and status that he offers in order to go with the vulgar Gatsby, who is only a trifling plaything to her. When forced to choose between her husband and her temporary lover, the choice is easy for the golden girl.

On the way back to the Eggs, Daisy asks Gatsby if she can drive his car in order to calm her nerves. When the car approaches the Valley of Ashes, Myrtle sees it and thinks that Tom is inside. She runs toward the car, waving her hands and hoping to see him before Wilson moves her away. When Daisy sees the woman, it is too late. She hits Myrtle, but keeps on driving, even though Gatsby tells her to stop. In the end, he pulls the emergency brake to halt the car and takes the driver's seat. He has already decided that he will take the blame for hitting Myrtle if it is ever discovered; Daisy must be protected. When Tom, Nick, and Jordan reach the accident, Tom is curious enough to stop. When he learns that Myrtle has been killed by a new, yellow car, he is crushed and infuriated. He believes that it is Gatsby who has killed his mistress and kept on going.

This eventful day is a turning point for Nick; ironically, it is also his thirtieth birthday. He finally sees the shallowness and carelessness of Daisy, Tom, and all the wealthy Easterners. As a result, he decides he does not want to spend the rest of his life in New York, married to some woman like Jordan Baker. He will move back to the Midwest and marry the girl back home. He knows for sure he has made the right decision when he learns that it was Daisy who was driving the car and never stopped and when Gatsby is needlessly shot by Wilson, who thinks Gatsby is his wife's lover and murderer. Daisy does not even call to express her sorrow or send flowers to the funeral. In fact, no one other than the hired help comes to Gatsby's funeral except for Nick, Gatsby's father (Mr. Gatz), and "Owl Eyes" from Gatsby's parties. It is a sad ending to a tragic life; but Nick knows that the ostentatious Gatsby, because of the purity of his dream and his devotion to it, is better than the "whole damn lot" of the Buchanans and their likes from East Egg.

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