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MonkeyNotes-Cymbeline by William Shakespeare
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After learning that she has disappeared from the palace, Cloten dresses up in Posthumus' old clothes and goes in search of Imogen and is killed by Guiderius, who had been impudently challenged by him. When Belarius and the young men retire to the cave, they find the page Fidele apparently dead. This death-like trance has been caused by a drug that Pisanio has received from the Queen and unsuspectingly passed on to Imogen. The trio takes the body of Imogen out of the cave to bury and cover her body with flowers. Later, Belarius brings the headless body of Cloten and lays it next to Imogen. Awakening from her trance, Imogen discovers at her side the headless corpse of Cloten, which she believes, because of his borrowed garments, to be that of her husband, Posthumus.

The Roman army invades Britain, and with the Roman army come Iachimo and Posthumus. However, at the last minute, Posthumus changes his Italian dress for that of a British peasant and fights on the British side. Imogen falls into the hands of the general Lucius and becomes his page.


The Britons defeat the Romans, thanks to the valor of Belarius, Guiderius and Arviragus, aided by the disguised Posthumus. However, Posthumus, pretending to be a Roman, is subsequently taken prisoner. In prison he has a vision of his family as well as the lord Jupiter. Jupiter leaves a prophetic document with him, which he is unable to decipher. Just as he is about to killed, Posthumus is taken in front of the king along with others. Lucius pleads with Cymbeline for the life of Fidele i.e Imogen in disguise. Moved by something in her appearance, the King spares her life and grants her a favor. She demands that Iachimo be forced to explain how he came by the ring he wears. Posthumus learns from his confession that his wife is innocent, but believing her to be dead, he is in despair until Imogen reveals herself. The King's joy at recovering his daughter is enhanced when Belarius restores to him his two lost sons, and the scene ends in a general reconciliation between Rome and Britain as well.

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MonkeyNotes-Cymbeline by William Shakespeare
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