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Free Study Guide-The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas-Summary
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CHAPTER SUMMARIES WITH NOTES

CHAPTER 80 - The Accusation

Summary

Speaking alone, Doctor díAvrigny tells Villefort that he suspects Valentine is the poisoner as she would be the one to benefit by the deaths of Noirtier and the Saint-Mérans and as she was the one who had the opportunity when sending medicine to the Saint-Mérans and in carrying lemonade to Noirtier. Villefort is in agreement with the doctor, but refuses to accuse Valentine. In anger and helplessness, the doctor says he will remain silent about his suspicions, but that he cannot come to the house again in good conscience. The doctor reports to everyone that Barrois died of age and over-exertion in a fit of apoplexy. That night, all of Villefortís servants quit.

Notes

Villefort is again driven by his own self-image to refuse to accuse anyone - particularly Valentine - of murder. "ĎListen,í cried he, Ďpity me - hep me!...If you drag us both before a tribunal I will still say, "No, my daughter is not guilty, there is no crime in my house. I will not acknowledge a crime in my house, for when crime enters a dwelling, it is like death - it does not come alone." As the doctor is more principled, he refuses to further abet Villefort in the denial of the murders, though he promises not to say anything.

CHAPTER 81 - The Room of the Retired Baker

Summary

After Morcerf leaves Danglars, Andrea Cavalcanti arrives at Danglarsí and tells Danglars of his wish to marry Eugénie, to which Danglars happily agrees after he is satisfied that Andrea has enough money and documents proving his birth. Andrea asks Danglars for 80,000 francs, which Danglars gives him the next day. Andrea then leaves 200 francs for Caderousse, who leaves a message for Andrea demanding he come to see him the next morning. Disguising himself, Andrea goes to see Caderousse, who then blackmails him for more money per month as he is aware Andrea is going to marry Eugénie. Andrea agrees, and tells Caderousse that he believes the Count of Monte Cristo is his true father, and that the Count has told him that he will inherit 500,000 when he dies. Caderousse, who wants more money, is impressed, and asks Andrea for the Countís exact address, which Andrea gives him in addition to a diagram of the Countís house. Caderousse then takes Andreaís diamond ring and although Andrea is growing more angry, he does not show Caderousse. It appears that Caderousse is planning to kill the Count during a robbery.


Notes

As Andrea and Danglars discuss the proposed marriage, they are both fully aware - according to the Countís plans and wishes - that the Count takes no public responsibility for the marriage plans or arrangement. While feigning good nature, Andrea/Benedetto is plotting to rid himself of Caderousseís blackmailing once and for all. Notably, when Andrea/Benedetto leaves, he pointedly asks if Caderousse wants to take anything else from him, to which Caderousse responds, "No; you are, after all, a good companion: I will not detain you, and will try to cure myself of my ambition."

CHAPTER 82 - The Burglary

Summary

The Count goes to his house in Auteuil, telling his servant that he does not intend to be in France longer than a month. He receives an anonymous letter warning him that his house will be burglarized that night. The Count secretly returns to Paris with a servant, and the two arm themselves and hide. A man cuts through his window with a diamond ring, and the servant notices another man "standing guard" across the street. Recognizing Caderousse, the Count disguises himself as the Abbé Busoni (who had visited Caderousse 10 years before). Caderousse is shocked to see the Abbé, who knows about his conviction for the murder of the jeweler and of his subsequent escape from the galleys which had been arranged by "Lord Wilmore" for Benedetto, his friend in the galleys. Caderousse tells the "Abbé" that Benedetto has been giving him money and that Benedetto believes the Count is his father.

When the "Abbé" threatens to tell Danglars about Benedetto/Andreaís identity, Caderousse tries unsuccessfully to kill him, and is instead forced to write a letter to Danglars revealing Andreaís identity. The Abbé agrees to send Caderousse enough money to live on if he leaves France, and the Count then watches as Caderousse is stabbed in the street by what the Count had supposed was Caderousseís accomplice.

Notes

Despite the Countís overreaching anger and desire for revenge, we learn in this chapter that he take a small sense of pleasure in what he is doing as well, a fact that will cause him emotional anguish at a later time. Dumas writes, "From his past life, from his resolution to shrink from nothing, the count had acquired an inconceivable relish for the contests in which he had engaged, sometimes against nature that is to say, against God, and sometimes against the world, that is, against the devil." The Count is surprised to see Caderousse here, but upon learning that he is involved with Benedetto/Andrea, resolves to use this relationship in his overall plan by having Caderousse write the accusatory message.

CHAPTER 83 - The Hand of God

Summary

Before Caderousse dies, the Count sends for Villefort, and hears Caderousse say it was Benedetto who stabbed him. The Count helps Caderousse to write a deposition naming Benedetto as his murderer, and then calmly tells Caderousse that he is being punished for all the wrong he has done, revealing himself as Edmond Dantès. Caderousse begs Godís forgiveness as he dies and the Count says "One!" after Caderousse is dead.

Notes

As implied by the chapterís title, the Countís overall plan has now claimed its first casualty, emphasized by the Count "mysteriously" pronouncing the word "One!" when Caderousse dies. Before Caderousse dies, the Count reveals his identity as Dantès, in what will prove to be a consistent action when revealing to his enemies that he is the source of their misery and that their misfortunes are not by chance, but planned as revenge. When Caderousse expresses his concern that Benedetto/Andrea will escape, the Count states, "No one, I tell you, will escape; Benedetto will be punished."

CHAPTER 84 - Beauchamp

Summary

The police and Villefort begin their search for Benedetto the murderer, as yet unaware that Andrea is Benedetto because the Count has not revealed it. Andrea prepares to marry Eugénie and receives word from his "fatherí in Parma that for his marriage, he will receive three million francs which will be given to Danglars to invest. In the meantime, Beauchamp returns from a trip to Yanina and tells Albert that it was indeed Fernand de Morcerf who betrayed Ali Tepelini, providing written statements by four distinguished men in Yanina as proof. Albert is crushed and forgives Beauchamp, who agrees to keep the secret. The two still do not know how the story surfaced, although Beauchamp suspects Danglars.

Notes

Albert is devastated by the revelation that his father betrayed Ali Tepelini, and conducts himself responsibly and kindly towards Beauchamp. Still unaware that the Count is behind all misfortunes taking place in Paris among his friends at present, Albert hopes the Count will help him.

CHAPTER 85 - The Journey

Summary

Albert and Beauchamp go to the Countís, who is glad to see that the two men have reconciled, and they discuss the impending marriage of Eugénie and Andrea, which the Count still refuses to admit having influenced. The Count proposes that Albert and Beauchamp accompany him on a trip to the sea, but Beauchamp states that he prefers to stay in Paris to watch the newspaper and perhaps discover the source of the story about Fernand. Albert and the Count leave immediately for Normandy, and the two are there three days when Albertís valet de chambre arrives with a newspaper and letter from Beauchamp.

Albert is stunned by the letter and also learns that his mother is very upset, and tells the Count that he must leave immediately, giving the Count the newspaper which contains a further article on the betrayal of Ali Tepelini, this time giving Fernand Mondegoís full name and identity as the traitor. The article has appeared in a paper other than Beauchampís.

Notes

In a further proof that the Count pities Albert, he attempts to remove him from the city during the time that he knows Fernandís treachery will be discovered in an attempt to shield Albert from embarrassment and pain. When the Count is unable to fully protect him from the news of his fatherís discovery even on their trip, he mutters, "Poor young man...it is then true that the sin of the father shall fall on the children to the third and fourth generation."

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