free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
Free Study Guide-The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas-Summary
Table of Contents | Message Board | Downloadable/Printable Version

CHAPTER SUMMARIES WITH NOTES

CHAPTER 97 - The Departure for Belgium

Summary

The marriage contract signing is aborted and Danglars gives his statement to the police. In private, Eugénie and Louise discuss their plan to leave Paris for Italy which they have been planning for three days. Armed with a previously arranged carriage, fake passports arranged by the Count and approximately 50,000 francs, the two leave immediately with Eugénie in disguise as a man.

Notes

As Eugénie and Louise prepare to flee Paris, we learn that the Count has also had a hand in helping the two escape Paris under disguise. Interestingly, the Countís role in this matter was not as fully described as were other actions undertaken by the Count and the reader may be surprised to learn that the Count had tricks up his sleeve that have yet to emerge - this revelation further serves to intensify the Countís "mysterious" demeanor and his overreaching control of all events taking place in Paris at this time.

CHAPTER 98 - The Bell & Bottle Tavern

Summary

As Andrea sneaks out of Danglarsí house during the marriage contract signing, he steals some jewels from Eugénieís on- display trousseau. He flees town and stops at an inn where he hires a horse. He continues on to Compiègne where he gets a room at the Bell and Bottle Inn where, unbeknownst to him, Eugénie and Louise are also staying. Planning to leave and disguise himself the next morning, he is stunned to see three gendarmes looking for him outside the inn the next morning and hides himself in the roomís chimney until the gendarmes are satisfied that Andrea has already escaped. Slipping into Eugénie and Louiseís room by the chimney to hide, the two girls scream. Andrea is captured and taken into custody.


Notes

As Andrea makes his escape, again Dumasí narrator voice intercedes to prompt the reader to think poorly of Andrea/Benedetto (thus making his story that much more effective): "Then he went to bed and almost immediately fell into that deep sleep which is sure to visit men of twenty years of age, even when they are torn with remorse. Now, here we are obliged to own that Andrea ought to have felt remorse, but that he did not." Before being caught, Eugénie urges Andrea/Benedetto to kill himself so that he might preserve some honour and avoid dying as a criminal in jail, but we see that Andrea/Benedetto is too proud, still believing that he will be freed by who he believes is his father (the Count), who has chosen not to correct this erroneous impression as it serves his purposes.

CHAPTER 99 - The Law

Summary

Troubled by the marriage contract signing affair and the shame it will bring, Madame Danglars goes to seek the advice of Debray, who is not home. Instead, she goes to see Villefort for advice the next morning. Villefort is so occupied in his own grief and misfortune that Madame Danglarsí concerns seem unimportant. Despite her plea that he be lenient with Andrea/Benedetto to save the Danglarsí honor, Villefort vows to punish him severely.

Notes

This chapter shows well the effect of the Countís punishment on both Madame Danglars and Villefort, although Villefort seems to be quickly learning what true misfortune and suffering is, when he tells Madame Danglars that what she has experienced is not a "fearful misfortune", but instead only a "mischance", since "I consider those alone misfortunes which are irreparable" - making reference to the deaths in his family. In this sense, the Count has begun to succeed in his punishment of Villefort, although the plan has not yet been fully executed. Ironically, however, Villefort is still willing to punish criminals who are as guilty or even less guilty than himself, as he expresses his determination to punish wicked persons - ignoring the fact that he is himself one of the most guilty: "..I never rest till I have torn the disguises from my fellow-creatures, and found out their weaknesses. I have always found them; and more - I repeat it with joy, with triumph - I have always found some proof of human perversity or error. Every criminal I condemn seems to me living evidence that I am not a hideous exception to the rest. Alas, alas, alas; all the world is wicked; let us therefore strike at wickedness!"

This statement is doubly ironic because Villefort failed to "tear the disguise" from the Count as he assumed the character of both Lord Wilmore and the Abbé Busoni, and also because Villefort is a hypocrite in claiming to strike at wickedness when in fact not only has he has struck at those who are not wicked (Dantès, Bertuccio), the Count alone is striking at true wickedness.

CHAPTER 100 - The Apparition

Summary

Four days after her collapse, Valentine is still very ill and confined to her bed. Late at night, the Count enters her room secretly and tells her that he is a friend who has been watching her day and night for Morrel. Valentine is doubtful, but the Count tells her that he has been replacing her poisoned food and drink with healthful substitutes to save her life for four days. As Valentine is unable to believe that anyone in her home could be poisoning her, the Count suggests she pretend to be asleep and watch carefully to see who enters her room that night.

Notes

In this chapter we see that the Count has now become Valentineís friend and protector as per his promise and friendship with Morrel. Having not slept for four days in his vigilance over Valentine, the reader is convinced of his wholehearted attempt to ensure she lives once he has determined that he can help Morrel in this way.

CHAPTER 101 - Locusts

Summary

Half an hour later, Valentine sees Madame de Villefort sneak into her room and empty a strange liquid into her glass. When Madame de Villefort has left, the Count comes back in and discovers that Madame de Villefort has now switched to a different, more powerful poison. Not understanding why her step-mother would want to kill her, the Count explains that with the death of the Saint-Mérans, Noirtier and herself, her half- brother Edward would then inherit everything as the only remaining heir. The Count also tells her that her step-mother has been planning these murders since he first met them in Italy years before. Valentine promises to trust the Count from this point on and to tell no one what is happening. The Count then gives her a tablet to swallow and tells her not to be afraid no matter what happens, even if she should wake up to find herself in a coffin.

Notes

In this chapter, the Count makes an unconscious reference to himself when speaking to Valentine, thus convincing himself that although the daughter of Villefort, Valentine truly is innocent - "Why? - are you so kind - so good - so unsuspicious of ill, that you cannot understand, Valentine?" In this way, the Count is assuming the role of the Abbé Faria, who also explained to him once upon a time that there are evil people who hurt innocent people. The Count also blames Villefort for not protecting his daughter, again making reference to Villefortís unwillingness to investigate the crimes in his house further.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Downloadable/Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
Free Study Guide-The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas-Summary
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright © PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 9:52:34 AM