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MonkeyNotes-The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
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PART IV

The Governor remains in constant league with the Proprietors Estates and allows no taxes to be levied against them. The Assembly commissions Franklin to appeal to the King regarding this issue. While Franklin is preparing to leave for London, Lord Loudoun arrives to settle the issue. He asks the Assembly to raise money for the defense of the frontiers and again exempts the Estates from paying taxes. The Assembly is very unhappy with the state of affairs, but has no choice but to accept the Lord's decision.

The Assembly's continuation of their fight is brought out by Franklin in a set of resolutions declaring their rights; he also states "that we did not relinquish our claim to those rights but only suspended the exercise of them on this occasion thro' force, against which we protested".

The Governor consents to let Franklin proceed to England. But his ship is at the disposal of Lord Loudoun, who delays the journey for three months. When he finally departs, Franklin takes time to observe the details that go into shipbuilding and recommends methodical procedures for each step of a ship's construction. The voyage is eventful, for his ship is chased by enemy vessels. Finally, on July 27, 1747, Franklin safely reaches London.

Franklin, on the advice of Dr. Fothergill, meets with the Proprietors before lodging any complaint against them. He hopes to solve the matter of taxation amicably. Franklin is introduced to Lord Granville, President of the King's Council, who tells Franklin that the King's instructions become the law of the land. Franklin informs him that the province charter has permitted them to make their own laws and send them for the King's consent.

The talks with the Proprietors fail, and the Attorney General and the Solicitor General delay in answering Franklin's paper that lodges complaints. In the meantime, the Assembly in America has persuaded Governor Danny to pass the bill taxing the Proprietary Estates. In England, the Proprietors try to stop the King from passing the bill, stating that their estates will be taxed unjustly. Franklin states that no such injustice can be done and that the bill being passed cannot be revoked for it would disturb the economy of the land. The Proprietors, in retaliation, remove the Governor from office. Franklin returns to Philadelphia on November 1, 1762, and his autobiographical narrative is ended.

Notes

The perseverance with which Franklin pursues all his assignments proves Franklin's mettle. The incidents in this section once again exhibit his leadership qualities of persuasiveness and his commitment towards his country and his people. Franklin serves himself, serves his society, and serves his country. Despite major opposition from the likes of Lord Loudoun, the Attorney General and the Solicitor General, Franklin achieves his objectives. His fight for justice and equality is once again successful.

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