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MonkeyNotes-The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
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FRANKLIN - HIS PRUDENCE

In this section, Franklin shows how he refuses to listen to people who attempt to mislead society. A man by the name of Samuel Mickle comes to Franklin and warns him that his new printing house will be a disaster; Mickle claims that Philadelphia is sinking into financial disaster. Franklin refuses to listen to such rumors and continues his hard work in the printing business. Before long, Philadelphia is prosperous once again, and Franklin reaps the benefits of the new prosperity.

With a group of friends, Franklin forms the Junto Club, which meets on Fridays. Every member of the club must answer at every meeting one or more inquiries about morals, politics, or natural philosophy; the purpose of the questioning is an effort to seek truth. In addition, once every three months, each member must write an essay on a topic of the member's choosing; the member must be able to defend the content of the essay. A director presides over all inquiries and debates. The director fines any member who speaks negatively during a debate. The club members include Joseph Breintnal, a copier of deeds for the scriveners; Thomas Godfrey, a self-taught mathematician; Nicholas Scull, a surveyor; William Parsons, a shoemaker; and other joiners, such as William Maugridge, Hugh Meredith, Stephen Potts, George Webb, Robert Grace, and William Coleman. Besides participating in club activities, these people greatly help Franklin in locating business for the printing house. Very soon Franklin's work is the talk of the town. Everybody has noticed the amount of time and effort put in by Franklin. Franklin himself notes that hard work pays rich rewards; advice that he passes on to the younger generations.

During this period, George Webb, who is working with Keimer, wants to work with Franklin. Though Franklin is willing to employ Webb, there is no work at hand. Franklin asks Webb to wait until he starts his newspaper. Franklin asks Webb not to reveal his plans, but Webb reveals the newspaper venture to Keimer, who quickly starts a newspaper of his own. When Keimer finds it difficult to manage the paper, he sells it to Franklin; it later became a very profitable venture for Franklin.

Franklin works hard on the newspaper, acting as the editor, a reporter, and sole manager of the press. He also improves the type style and printing. As a result, the number of subscribers gradually increases.

Notes

In this section, Franklin's hard word, diligence, and perseverance are once again described. When he starts his new printing business, Franklin is determined to make it prosper. He refuses to listen to those who have negative things to say. Due to his personal effort, the business prospers. His starting of the Junto Club is another successful venture for Franklin. Through this club, he makes influential friends who help him in his printing business. It also allows him to develop his writing and persuasive skills. When Franklin buys the newspaper from Keimer, he determines to make a success of it as well. He serves as reporter, editor, and pressman. Once again his efforts pay off and the subscriptions steadily increase, largely due to Franklin's own writing in the paper.

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