free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
Free Study Guide-The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver-Free Book Notes
Table of Contents | Message Board | Downloadable/Printable Version

THEMES ANALYSIS

The most powerful of the three themes is the theme of family. The interesting twist is the fact that none of the "families" in the novel are actually families in the nuclear sense. Taylor Greer, the protagonist, comes from a nonstandard family. She was raised solely by her mother, in an atmosphere of love, acceptance, and self-esteem. The absence of a father had no obvious negative impact. Mother and daughter made an effective family unit.

Taylor ventures out into the world and becomes an instant mother when a child is left on her car seat. Parenting an abandoned child is certainly an extraordinary approach to the concept of family. She and the child, Turtle, become as mother and daughter. For a brief time, Taylor has the assistance of Sandy, the Burger Derby waitress, and Kid Central Station at the mall to assist her. Taylor quickly realizes, however, that mothering needs to consist of more than just a convenient arrangement of job and childcare.

Lou Ann Ruiz on the other hand holds tightly to the more conventional definition of family and even has her ex-husband move in temporarily to keep up appearances when relatives visit. She wants desperately to play the role of the good mother, but being single she finds it hard to approve of herself in that role. It is not until the end of the novel that Lou Ann verbalizes her acceptance of a new definition of family.


Mattie, who seems to consider everyone family, brings Estevan and Esperanza into Taylorís life. The two end up traveling with Taylor and as the climax of the novel approaches, Taylor realizes that the usual view of family is easy for other people to envision. She even sees for herself how "normal" it seems for Estevan, Esperanza and Turtle to be together. It is the believability of this picture that facilitates Taylorís adoption of Turtle. These four, Taylor, Turtle, Estevan and Esperanza, who each in his own way represents a family torn apart, define family in truth, "a whole invisible system for helping out... that youíd never guess was there."

The second theme is artfully illustrated in Kingsolverís descriptions of nature. The beauty of life can be found in apparently empty places. Graphic accounts of a stream in the desert, flowers from bare dirt, life awakened by summerís first rain, and most remarkably, the night-blooming cereus, depict not only natureís majesty, but also the reality of everyday miracles. Each occurrence causes Taylor to take pause and, in so doing, allows the reader to understand that everyday miracles are happening in Taylorís life as well.

The third theme underscores the power of the community of women. Taylor and her mother have made it on their own. Taylor and Sandy find a way to help each other out. Taylor and Lou Ann handle jobs, a home, and the crises, real and perceived, of raising children without once calling a husband or father for assistance. And Mattie, the caretaker of so many, takes on international problems at Jesus Is Lord Used Tires. Even the men in the novel adjust their lives to the will of women and mothers (best exemplified by Angelís responses to Lou Annís mother and his own.)

Table of Contents | Message Board | Downloadable/Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
Free Study Guide-The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver-Free Chapter Summary
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright © PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 9:52:24 AM