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MonkeyNotes-Antigone by Jean Anouilh
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STRUCTURE

Jean Anouilh's Antigone has its own distinct form and structure, although its model is similar to Sophocles' Antigone. Anouilh's play has only one set and is played without a break. Structurally it is divided into three sections; it can also be broken down into eight episodes, even though they are not broken down as scenes in the play.

I) The Chorus introduces the cast and narrates the past.

II) Antigone talks to the Nurse, Ismene, and Haemon. In so doing, she reveals what she is planning and breaks her link to simple human happiness that comes from childhood, innocence, youth, romance, and maternal love.


III) The guards talk of finding Antigone.

IV) The Chorus finds Antigone guilty and discusses tragedy.

V) The guards catch Antigone defying the edict.

VI) A debate rages between Creon and Antigone. Each talks about the meaning of happiness. He exposes her irrational breaking of his law. She renounces all her ties and defies Creon. The Chorus tries to reason with Creon.

VII) The guards take Antigone away to her doom. Haemon comes to see Creon. The scene moves to the cave of Hades where Antigone is found hanged, causing the deaths of Haemon and then his mother.

VIII) The final tragedy is the Chorus' and Messenger's narration.

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