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Free Study Guide-1984 by George Orwell-Free Online Booknotes Summary
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CHAPTERS 9 - 10

Summary

It is the end of the week-long celebration of hate. The targets of this celebration are all those who the Ingsoc claims to be traitors or a threat to the state of Oceania. After the celebration, really a mass frenzy against the traitors and the constant singing of the hate song, Winston goes to the secret hideout with the black book containing Goldstein's principles for the Brotherhood. He reads first few chapters aloud to Julia. In these chapters, there is a description of how the superstates of Oceania, Eurasia, and East Asia were created. The relationship between these three states and the purposes of constant war are also explained. Winston stops reading when he realizes that Julia has fallen asleep. For some time, Winston is contented lying peacefully next to Julia; then he also falls asleep.

Julia and Winston both wake up and stand at the window holding each other and listening to a fat woman singing a popular love song. While still at the window, a voice from somewhere behind them orders them to freeze. The Thought Police surround the entire shop, and both Julia and Winston are arrested. To Winston's shock, the old man who owns the shop, Mr. Charrington, turns out to be in the Thought Police.

Notes

The 'Book' in the novel is a parody on Leon Trotsky's The Revolution Betrayed. In fact the traitorous Goldstein, who has supposedly written the black book, is even described as looking like Trotsky. The book gives Winston new insights into how Ingsoc retains its power through changing the facts of history and controlling the minds of people. It also shows how the Party creates whatever reality it chooses. Winston agrees with the ideas in the book; but he still does not learn about the motive of the Party.


Orwell has prepared the reader for the arrest of the couple in an ironic way. Winston has just been reading the supposed Black Book of the Brotherhood to Julia. It has been given to him by O'Brien, whom Winston has naively and uncharacteristically trusted, just as he has trusted Charrington. He has gained a few new insights from the book, but Julia has fallen asleep while he read to her. As always, she has no interest in political views. Feeling relaxed, secure, and content, Winston decides to sleep beside his lover. When they wake, they stand in an embrace at the window, not fearing discovery in this proletariat part of town. Then in this moment of pure contentment, Big Brother calls out to them. Julia and Winston have been set up every step of the way, from Charrington to O'Brien.

At the time of their arrests, the glass paper weight is appropriately smashed to pieces. It has been Winston's idealistic symbol of freedom for Julia and himself. Like the paperweight, Winston's dreams have suddenly been shattered against the harsh reality of the Party. Julia virtually vanishes from the story after her arrest, and Part III concentrates on Winston's confrontation with O'Brien.

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